Arsène Lupin, Gentleman Burglar

Arsène LupinArsène Lupin, Gentleman Burglar (aka: Exploits of Arsène Lupin) is the first collection of stories about the character Lupin.  It was published in 1907, but the contents were all previously published.  The author, Maurice, Leblanc (1864 – 1941) was born in Rouen.  He dropped out of law school and is generally known only as a writer – famous for the Lupin catalog.  Arsène Lupin, Gentleman Burglar collects nine stories that present a continuous, albeit hyphenated, timeline in the early exploits of the so-called gentleman thief, Lupin.

I gave this collection four stars in total, but I really did enjoy reading these stories. There is no great literary depth to these stories, however they are fun and have just enough suspense included to make the reader turn the pages with interest. I suppose anyone who enjoys Nero Wolf, Poirot, and Holmes will also enjoy this collection.  It is easy reading and entertaining writing.

After having read this collection, I would read further in the Arsène Lupin canon. I like these stories and even if they are sometimes simplistic, I think Lupin is a character that major readers should recognize.  I think Lupin is most famous for his connection to Sherlock Holmes; particularly in this collection wherein they cross paths for the first time.  The whole scene is written perfectly and the reader should be able to imagine it vividly.  It also begs to be put on stage/screen.

I rated the nine stories included in this collection separately and then averaged them for rating the whole. The dates provided are for their first publishing in magazines, etc. :

  • The Arrest of Arsène Lupin – July 1905 – 4 stars
  • Arsène Lupin in Prison – December 1905 – 4 stars
  • The Escape of Arsène Lupin – January 1906 – 4 stars
  • The Mysterious Traveler – February 1906 – 5 stars
  • The Queen’s Necklace – April 1906 – 4 stars
  • Seven of Hearts – May 1907 – 3 stars
  • The Safe of Madame Imbert – May 1906 – 3 stars
  • The Black Pearl – July 1906 – 3 stars
  • Sherlock Holmes Arrives Too Late – June 1906 – 4 stars

Readers really must start with the first story in the collection: The Arrest of Arsène Lupin.  This story connects, beautifully, with the last in the collection and so there is a definite reading order to be followed. I liked the first story quite a bit, because Leblanc toys with the reader enough to make the story fun and witty.  I feel that it is also a curious thing to start off a catalog of stories about a thief with a story about his arrest!

My favorite story in the collection is The Mysterious Traveler because it is one in which Leblanc displays his skill at position his characters in different roles and swapping the points-of-view.  This is one of the noteworthy things about Leblanc’s style in this collection:  the narrator is rarely the same and Leblanc seems to enjoy such little tricks in storytelling.  It is part of what makes these stories so much fun.

Overall, as I have mentioned, these stories are quite easy reading and entertaining.  Still I can count at least three times in which the reader is given a deeper glimpse into Lupin’s heart and history.  Lupin, though adventurous and clever, also possesses a measure of sorrow, of loss, and of romanticism. Maybe this is because Leblanc is French and was influenced by Flaubert.  Whatever the cause, there are moments of gasp-worthy romanticism and melancholy. But Leblanc doesn’t wallow in these fleeting moments – the insensitive reader will probably miss them entirely. Lupin hides his melancholy and toska. [toska – a Russian word meaning………… ?]

Recommended for a quick, fun read. Also for readers interested in “gentlemen burglars” and Sherlock Holmes.

4 stars

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