Day: October 9, 2019

One Rough Man

12092971I really do not like the title of this novel because it just seems, in 2019, to be something one would find in the romance novel section, full of cliches.  Instead, One Rough Man by Brad Taylor is totally an action-thriller pseudo-pulp novel full of gunfire and operators. There are terrorists and government officials and Navy SEALs all over the place. Its also the first novel by the author; published 2011. I read the mass market paperback that I think I picked up used somewhere.

I do not read a lot of modern genre fiction like this. This year I have tried to clean off some of my tbr-list and I have found a number of novels like this one in the stacks. These novels are tasty treats; good for down-time and relaxed afternoons.  This one actually surprised me a little because it was a little lengthy. I feel like maybe it should have ended 50-100 pages sooner. Not that the story is bad, but one can only have just so many firefights in one novel. 104 chapters are inside with about two to four pages per chapter.

Good things first:  the author’s realism on most points. A lot of novels like this can get over-the-top quickly with unbelieveable situations and heroics. However, if readers are being honest, these books are not read for their perfect reasonability. Part of their charm is their ability to present a hero that really does exceed expectations and maybe is a little better at everything that he ought to be. Sure, some elements here are a little exaggerated, but I was actually surprised at how realistic the author played it.  Do not get me wrong, the main character/hero is Pike Logan and bullets just miss him. He is ridiculously good at what he does, but he does seem to have a helluva lot of luck on his side. But, good for the author on this one, the character recognizes it and marvels over it. He knows when his luck is unbelieveably good.

I liked the lack of sex in the novel. Usually the thing with action novels is that they tend to this tedious stereotyping of characters and their demeanors. I would not have been surprised to read about the hero rescuing a young lass from a building that was exploding, surviving a firefight with a country’s entire infantry forces, and then having sex in a rundown, hotel outside of town. This is what action movies have shown us happens! Its absurd and idiotic. In this novel, however, the fight scenes are relatively realistic – and I like how the author presents the main character’s decision making when entering these fights and making in-operation choices. I like how the author makes the operators in this novel realistic in their actions and opinions – for the most part. That is, the soldiers are not all flamboyant donkeys and the bad guys are not outlandish and comical.  The reactions of the characters are realistic, particularly when they make a mistake or when they are uncomfortable.

The thing that the author excels at is letting the reader see how situations develop, how events are monitored and evaluated, and how small groups plan and enact their battles. Time and again I was under the impression that the author had a lot of first-hand knowledge of directing these operations. His expertise really added to the quality of the story. Without it, the story surely would have been just another action splatter.

The supporting cast were all well written. I mean, sure, there is a lot of “coincidence” and luck. Some of that is tough to believe. However, this is a novel and its to be read for entertainment. Things that are mundane and typical are really rarely entertaining. So, okay, deal with the fact that the female main character, Jennifer, has the physical abilities of a parkour/circus expert. How handy for this sort of storyline!

Jennifer is also pleasantly snarky, too. I say pleasantly because I mean that she was realistic and her sarcasm did not seem “scripted” and stilted.

“What do we do now? Are we still going to D.C., or are we headed to Mexico to find a cheap house to spead the rest of our lives?” – pg. 321, chapter 63

Overall the dialogue was very good. I am finding, as I read more contemporary books, that the dialogue often seems unnatural or stilted or just plain stupid. Dialogue has to be convincing for the whole book to work. A character can be described and I can get a play-by-play, but if their conversation seems like an overlay put on the skeleton, it ruins the whole book and I’m an unconvinced, disappointed reader.

As I met the bad guys and the opportunists in the book I did feel angry and fretted over the well-being of our heroes. I guess this is to say that I was invested reading the story and I really do dislike the devious, evil bad guys.

My concern for this series is that I wonder if the main character gets tedious? He is likeable and definitely highly-skilled. But does the reader tire of hearing his thoughts and reading about his emotional struggles? Will readers get bored with seeing just how awesome Pike Logan is? What is the mileage on characters like this?

Anyway, more or less, I can recommend this to all readers. It is kind of a long read, but I think it is a solid entertainment, particularly for fans of action-thrillers and gear-geeks. In reality, this is somewhere between three and four stars.

3 stars