comics

The Black Beetle #1

The Black Beetle - Francesco Francavilla; Dark Horse Comics; 2013

The Black Beetle – Francesco Francavilla; Dark Horse Comics; 2013

In 2011, in the anthology series Dark Horse Presents, Francesco Francavilla presented his new character/comic.  In Dark Horse Presents issues #11 – 13, the short storyarc “Night Shift” was serialized.  I hate paying $7.99 for Dark Horse Presents – especially when I am really unsure about some of the items included.  But finally, in September 2012, I found Dark Horse Presents #11 on sale and eagerly read the short Black Beetle stuff.  It was really good.  I never got around to locating and purchasing #12 and #13.  This irked me a little bit, because what little we got in #11 left off on a cliffhanger.  In 2013, though, Dark Horse finally started releasing a volume of The Black Beetle – starting with issue #0, which collected the entire “Night Shift” story from Dark Horse Presents.

What made me so very interested in this new creation by Francavilla?  Simply I think he’s an excellent artist.  I cannot really speak for his writing since I have not read enough to make a good assessment. However, I loved his artwork in the Black Panther volume he did as well as the art for the Captain America issues he did (Captain America & Bucky and Captain America & Black Widow ).   I really like his artwork.  The main reason is that I feel that it is actually artwork – as opposed to perfunctory comic book drawing.  If you read enough comic books, you should get a sense of the different styles of the various artists.  Not all things done by each artist are fantastic – many have a sort of “perfunctory” feel to them.  Filler issues, the burden placed on the writer rather than artist, nothing standout, etc.  However, Francavilla’s art is very clearly his when you see it.  And it looks so good that it makes you want to read whatever the writer is writing.

I am not very good at describing artwork. I can only use the words that seem to fit according to my experience. So, forgive me if any of this is indelicate.  Francavilla’s artwork seems (to me) to not be focused on excessive detail or realism.  He relies on basic framing, understanding of shadows and inks, and his own color palette of favorite colors. Generally, oranges, blacks, blues. Nothing overly colorful and kaleidoscope-y.

Black Beetle frame (issue #1) - Francesco Francavilla, 2013; Dark Horse Comics

Black Beetle frame (issue #1) – Francesco Francavilla, 2013; Dark Horse Comics

Anyway, I picked up issue #1, which starts the 4-part story “No Way Out.”   I am a little icky because I wanted to find #0, but alas.  Anyway, Black Beetle is a style of costumed hero living in Colt City – which is a 1930’s-esque time period urban city on the East Coast.   The whole concept of the story and art is in the tradition of “pulp” vintage crime stuff.  I do not want to give anything away, so I am going to be really brief with the synopsis:  Black Beetle is doing surveillance on Colt City clubs that the gangster families frequent.  Roxy Club, Coco, Spencer’s, etc.  And at one of these, an explosion occurs – Beetle then seeks out the culprit. It is not who he expects to find. And we learn a little bit about the geography of Colt City along the way.

I gave this issue 8/10 stars on the comic book site that I frequent.  For here, I am going to ballpark it at four stars.  I love the art – I’ve already said that.  The story is good – because it does have that true vintage crime pulp feel.  The ads in the issue are minimal (I think there was one? Thank you Dark Horse!).  However, I demand a lot from first issues and I was not in total awe after finishing the issue. I re-read it and felt comfortable with my rating.  Also, I am very interested in pulling the next issue.

4 stars

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X-O Manowar #1 (2012)

X-O Manowar

X-O Manowar #1; Valiant Entertainment (2012)

X-O Manowar is a comics character that was created in 1992 by Jim Shooter, Bob Layton, and Joe Quesada. If you are unfamiliar with those names – they are some of the big Marvel creators in the 1970s and 1980s.  I could bore you with details about company properties within and without Marvel Comics and Valiant Entertainment. Somehow, though, I feel that would deflate any excitement over the actual comic book – so let’s just move onward.

X-O Manowar is science fiction – and is a really good fix for someone who is a big science fiction fan.  On Free Comic Book Day 2012, I got the preview by Valiant comics that featured X-O Manowar.  I was excited, of course, because the cover art looks fantastic. I added it to my pull list at my local comic book store.  Well, it took forever for my issues to come in (don’t ask….).  In my travels I found a clean copy of X-O Manowar #0 from 1993 for $1.  And then one weekend at my comic book store – all of the first four issues of the current run of the title arrived!

I read the 1993 issue and enjoyed it. The cover is a glossy-foil cover by Quesada and Jim Palmiotti and shows X-O Manowar in front of an explosion in space.  It looks like early 1990s cover art – but it should catch the eye of any science fiction fan. Space. Lasers. Armor. Finally I read the first issue of the 2012 volume.  This is another really awesome cover. I say that because it has such a science fiction feeling to it – and the coloring, which highlights only X-O Manowar – makes the cover really eye-catching, I think.

X-O Manowar #0

X-O Manowar #0; Valiant 1993

This newest issue keeps, more or less, to the same overall storyline as presented in the old #0 1993 issue.   Aric Dacia is a Visigoth. He, and all the men in his clan, fight the Romans.  Generally, the Visigoths get walloped by the Romans.  In the 1993 version Aric’s father Rolf dies in single combat as Roman troops have entered his home. In the 2012 version, Rolf is wounded on the battlefield, Aric brings him home, but Rolf dies in his bunk.  Either way, the son is enraged and develops an even more acute desire for vengeance.

That night, the Visigoths discover a “Roman transport” and Roman troops. What has happened is the Visigoths mistake aliens for Romans. Led by the emotional and rash Aric, the Visigoths attack the alien ship and are (no surprise here) defeated.  The aliens haul the surviving Visigoths onboard and take off into space.  From the moment Aric regains consciousness, his thoughts are on escape and vengeance.  He’s still a bit muddled about who he is actually fighting – but that does not matter too much to him.  Frankly, I prefer the setup in the 2012 version a bit more than the 1993, but both are good science fiction fun.  The 1993 issue takes the storyline a bit further in the first issue, but I think the 2012 ends at a good stopping point for the issue.

Now, that is a really choppy data-dump sort of introduction to X-O Manowar.  But what I feel readers should take away from my review here is that X-O Manowar fills this little niche in comic books that exists between the superhero and the soap opera drama in comic books.  There are not too many true science fiction comics out there.  Marvel Comics publishes a group of titles that they refer to as their cosmic titles. These include things like Guardians of the Galaxy, Nova, and Quasar.  However, none of these titles are currently running. Some of the trouble with those titles is that they are contained within the overarching Marvel Universe – so a great deal of familiarity with the Marvel Universe makes them more readable, hence more enjoyable.  But sometimes, too, superheroes show up within the pages.

I like X-O Manowar because it is also fun – there is a rambunctious Visigoth who is kidnapped by aliens and who bonds with their special power armor – which can only be worn by “the worthy.”  Let me cash this out for you a bit further:  a barbarian, who is fighting Roman soldiers, is taken into space by aliens and acquires power armor. If you do not like that last phrase I typed there….. I cannot help you. You are not truly a science fiction fanatic.   Sure, this might not be literature, but this sure is fun and it makes me happy! Enjoy your sci-fi!

4 stars

Batman and Robin #9

Batman & Robin #9

Batman & Robin #9; DC Comics

I have not done a review of a comic book in half-of-forever.  I know that there are some “snobby geeks” out there who disdain comic books (or are more selective and merely disdain superhero comic books) arguing that they are not literature.  Well, the thing that I want to insist upon is that no, not all comic books are literature, however, what DC Comics has done in the Bat-titles in “The New 52” has definitely been literature.  Since the #1 issues in Detective Comics and Batman, DC Comics writers (Scott Snyder, Kyle Higgins, Peter J. Tomasi, and Tony Daniel) have created an epic-story that really deserves all the praise that people have been heaping upon it.  (And, the obnoxious writer of the DC stable, Grant Morrison, has rather stalled out in his titles…)

This review is about Batman and Robin #9.  It’s somewhat of a standalone issue focusing entirely on Robin (the Damian Wayne incarnation).  This issue is, however, entirely connected to the Night of the Owls storyline that has been running through the Bat-titles since their first issues.  This epic Court of Owls/Night of the Owls storyline is huge and has been done expertly.  The writers have, as a whole, really outdone themselves and, I think, given readers a solid example of how and why comics can, indeed, be literature.  Yeah, the whole thing spans (I approximate here) 25 issues or so for the full-impact of the story.  A reader could conceivably narrow it all down to just the Batman and Detective Comics titles, but I think that would weaken the scope of what the writers have done.  In any case, I am not going to get into a lengthy exposition on the Owls epic.  I do encourage readers to consider this stuff, though – it’s really worth it (though it may be a pain in the rear to collect all of the issues.)

Anyway, Batman and Robin #9 is a really awesome issue.  I have actually been surprised at how much I have liked this particular title since The New 52 began.  I loved the first arc (the ramifications will definitely continue throughout future issues) because it explored the relationship between Bruce Wayne and his son – in both a father/son perspective as well as a Batman/Robin perspective.

Issue #9 ties into the Night of the Owls storyarc.  Let us simply say that Robin is dispatched, by Alfred, to protect a target from a villain.  The Court of Owls have sent assassins out to kill nearly 40 Gotham leaders and Alfred sends Robin to protect Major General Benjamin Burrows of the 52nd – who commands nearly 15,000 troops.

I love more or less everything about this issue.  The title of the issue is Robin Hears a Hoo – which is fun because it plays on the Owls storyline and Dr. Seuss.  Dr. Seuss and Batman? Always a win.  And look at this cover because it was done by Patrick Gleason, Mick Gray, and John Kalisz.  It is beautiful.  The perspective is perfect – Robin is a little kid, you know.  The coloring is perfect. The whole composition shows action, depth, no clutter or unnecessary busyness, and an ominous villain.  Perfect.

Inside, the issue contains non-confusing artwork, clean framing, and excellent coloring.  I like how it really feels like we are on a nighttime training exercise in a misty forest. I like how Robin solves the difficulties he runs into.  I also love the scenes where the writer shows us that Robin is not just a stupid punk kid – but is also highly-trained and intelligent. I like how the soldiers react and function.  I also like how this issue gives deeper insight into the total backstory and connection to the Court of Owls.  There is not much to dislike about this issue. It is precisely the kind of issue that comic book fans can collect, enjoy, and happily spend $2.99 on.  And $2.99 is a bargain for the quality this issue delivers.

Batman isn’t in this issue.  And he really does not have to be:  Robin carries this issue all by himself.  And the issue is good.

5 stars

Uncanny X-Men #1 (2012)

Uncanny X-Men #1

Uncanny X-Men #1; Marvel Comics

Marvel’s efforts to reorganize (let’s use that euphemism) their X-titles worked for me.   I had no history in reading X-titles, and so I felt out-of-the-loop, as they say, regarding any of the characters and storylines.  While the Marvel Universe is generally run as an organic whole, everything related to the X-Men has always seemed to run parallel to and almost separately from the rest of the Marvel Universe.  This isn’t true, but the X-titles do tend to make up their own microcosm as opposed to how the Avengers correlate to the Marvel Universe.  Uncanny X-Men was a title that Marvel ran from 1963 – 2011 with over 550 issues (including annuals).  Therefore, jumping into the complex X-Men world was basically impossible from my point of view.

In 2010-2012, Marvel restarted, renumbered, and reorganized most of the X-Men titles – without destroying any of their past historical events.  My favorite Marvel writer, Jason Aaron, was given the Wolverine title and the Wolverine & The X-Men titles.  A title just called X-Men was started and in 2012, Marvel restarted Uncanny X-Men at issue #1. If ever readers were going to get involved in X-titles – this was definitely the best opportunity.

The events of Uncanny X-Men #1 are directly related to the events that take place in the mini-event X-Men Schism and are connected to both the Wolverine and X-Men titles.  Could a reader successfully read this issue without having read those I just mentioned? Of course; however, I can say that it really is the best option to have at least read the X-Men Schism mini-event. The writer for Uncanny X-Men #1 is Kieron Gillen and it’s obvious his first order of business is to explain something of what’s going on in the X-Men world without making things too messy.  His second task is to put forth an engaging storyline that should propel this particular title forward from issue #1.   I think that he succeeds in doing both, although the issue does not turn out to be anything fantastic.

Right away the reader is given the roster of those X-Men who are on the island Utopia.  The reader is also directly given the new and improved purpose and goal of these X-Men.  From the brain and mouth of Cyclops the reader learns, alongside the new organization of X-Men, what this team’s mission will be.  Welcome to the concept of Extinction Team.  This is a basic storyline. However, I cannot say that it’s entirely new in the X-Men world, little of it that I know.

“That is our primary aim, anything else is just survival.  It’s something we’ve tried before, but never on a big enough scale.  If this team saves humanity from extinction enough, people will realize how badly they need us.  In short, we’ve always been earth’s mightiest heroes.  Extinction team will prove it.” – Cyclops

That quote is from only two frames in the issue and I feel most readers who read without care might miss what was said there.  Like I said above, this is not exactly a new directive for X-Men – Cyclops readily admits that in this quote.  The difference is that it is now going to be attempted on a larger scale.  Well, I am sure that X-Men fans can argue the point of whether or not this has been done before.  But notice the last part of the quote:  Cyclops calls the X-Men “earth’s mightiest heroes” – which is actually the longtime tagline and monicker of none other than the Avengers.  Clearly, this presages the upcoming 2012 Marvel yearly event “Avengers vs. X-Men.”   Who are earth’s mightiest heroes?

A villain, Mr. Sinister, is introduced quickly – on first meeting him, he seems like a rather cool villain to me.  I mean, he’s ruthless, unhesitating, and “classy.”  But the part I did not like is this oddball goofy usage of the weird robot/alien Celestial.  And then Mr. Sinister controls and flies off in the thing’s head. Yeah, this seemed really goofy and silly.  However, I did get a kick out of what Mr. Sinister did when he lands the head at San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts!  This villain and what’s he’s done there is the most interesting aspect of the issue.  (Also, Namor is his pompous-cocky self, even if it’s just a frame or two.)

3 stars

Batman #8

Batman 8Issue #8 of Batman was really good. I debated giving it the full five stars, but I am stingy lately and am only going to give it four.  This issue was written and drawn by the continuing team of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo.  Capullo’s artwork has not been wow-ing me, but it’s been good. The writing, though, is probably the element that is getting this volume of Batman all of the praise and credit.  Some issues have been great, some have been just good. I think Snyder has some good ideas and is trying to make the main character a little different than the “regular” Batman.  Snyder is trying to “extend” the boundaries of what’s been done with the character – which is no easy thing since Batman has been written by so many writers through the years.

The cover is good for a few reasons, I think.  The main reason is that it actually is relevant to the inside story.  I really don’t like issues that have covers that look pretty but are completely unrelated to the issue’s story.  It’s deceptive and misleading when issues have covers that do that.  But this cover comes directly out of the storyline.  Another reason that it is good is that it maintains that creepy castle-like tone that is running through the “Owl” storyarc that Snyder has been writing.  Just the words “night” and “bat” and “owl” demand the artwork is creepy and eerie.  And this definitely is; however I look at the background and it looks like poorly blended digital artwork or a badly made oil painting.  What are these color marks especially on the left side of the cover? I dislike it.  It looks half-done or lazy. Is it Capullo or the colorist?

The title of this issue is “Attack on Wayne Manor” and that’s basically what this story is about. If you have not read this issue – this review will contain spoilers.  Anyway, the issue begins with Bruce Wayne brooding in his manor at night.  I’ll be honest, I have always known Bruce Wayne to be a brooding individual – it’s part of his charm, let’s say. However I did feel that in this issue Snyder moved a little too close to the line of whining as opposed to brooding.  On the third page, I absolutely hate the frame wherein Alfred lights the model city up and Bruce Wayne looks like a teenager who is getting picked on.  I know that recently he underwent a lot of physical trauma, but somehow that image/reaction of Wayne annoyed me.  Is it Capullo’s art again?  Or does it just make Wayne seem skittish and melodramatic? I hate that frame.

This issue is basically a home-invasion issue. The assassins, Talons, invade Wayne Manor – and only Alfred and Bruce are there to do anything about it.  They scurry in opposite directions – although, at the end of the issue, I have to say I don’t know why Bruce bothered to go to the roof. Anyway, they meet up in the Bat Cave in the Armor Room.  Something like a castle panic room.

So, why did Bruce run to the roof in the first place?  And also, how did this many assassins invade Wayne Manor so easily. I guess it’s hard to move completely into the “New DC 52” where this is a new Bruce and a new Wayne Manor.  I am used to Wayne Manor being an impenetrable fortress, really.  Sure, the talons are good at what they do, but come on – it’s that easy to invade BATMAN’s home? Tough pill to swallow as a reader, I suppose.

When Bruce leaves the armor room in big badass armor and says: “Get the hell out of my house!” …. it kind of makes up for the opening of the issue where Bruce was “lost in his own head.”  Also, the plan that Batman and Alfred came up with – dropping the temperature – seems like a good idea and I am excited to see what happens in the next part of the story.  Throughout, this is a fairly intense issue, lots of action and creepiness to turn the pages quickly. I liked the issue a lot, but I cannot ignore the questions/problems that I mentioned above.  I have high hopes for this storyarc, though, and think that Snyder is working hard on these issues.

4 stars

Earth 2 #1

Earth 2 #1

Earth 2 #1; DC Comics

Now that we are more than 9 issues into the DC New 52, much of the novelty has worn off of the initiative.  Some titles got canceled (Mister Terrific and OMAC being two of the most significant to me).  DC introduced a “Second Wave” which released a small group of new titles – whether this was planned from the start or was a backup for if/when titles were canceled, I have no idea.  I have to believe that there was going to be an Earth 2 in the overall scheme from the start.  So, when DC released this first issue of the new title Earth 2, I was not surprised, but I was interested.

Part of the driving thrust of the New 52 was to engage new readers and diversify the titles.  Earth 2 is not a new creation – it has a long (and sometimes difficult) history in DC Comics. Earth 2 first appeared in the 1960s in the Flash and All Star Squadron titles. Since then, this alternate/parallel universe has been used for a number of purposes throughout the DC line.  From the 1970s onward, however, most of the purpose of Earth 2 was to showcase the Justice Society – or Justice Society of America.  As usual, everything in DC Comics usually stems from Flash, oddly enough, and not Superman or Batman.  So, Earth 2 was really designed to explain concepts and history surrounding Flash (in all his personas).  I wondered:  how does DC “introduce” the difficult concept/history of Earth 2 to new readers?

True to form, all Crises in the DC universe (and they are always in a crisis) center upon Flash.  However, readers actually liked the happenings and characters in the Earth 2 universe.  Therefore, the Justice Society became a style of the Justice League of Earth 1.  The Justice Society has had a variety of incarnations, members, writers/artists, and titles. It was only a matter of time, it seemed, when DC would re-introduce Earth 2 as part of the New 52.

Now, I became enamored with Earth 2 in the 2000s when I read the Justice Society of America title.  I consequently went back and learned more about the make-up and history of the Justice Society.  However, since the New 52 is really supposed to be a hard reboot, I wanted to approach this new title as if none of the past mattered. I wanted to read this new title as if there had never been an Earth 2 or a Justice Society.  The creative team for this title is starting with writer James Robinson with Nicola Scott drawing.  Robinson said a number of things related to this reboot in an interview with Newsarama.com in March 2012.  He made these points:

  • This is a complete reboot of the Earth 2 concept.
  • Earth 2 has a “five-year jumping on point like the main DCU Earth” for its superhero story.
  • Jay Garrick is the “everyman” through which readers are introduced to the world of Earth 2. The name Jay Garrick may be familiar to seasoned readers as the elderly Golden Age Flash, in Earth 2, he’s younger, as seen in our exclusive art for the cover of Earth 2 #2.
  • Alan Scott and Al Pratt are also key characters in the story of Earth 2.
  • It isn’t the Justice Society. It’s Earth 2. So it’s going to be a whole world of different characters.

All of these new reboot ideas seem fantastic – and perfect for a new reader.  Also, I think Robinson is a solid choice for a writer – he is well-versed in Justice Society work – since he has already written dozens of issues in that line.  However, I do worry a bit because I do not want Robinson to fall back on what he used to know and do with those old Justice Society titles. I want new, better, exciting, and different.  He’s a proven writer and I think he is familiar enough with the Earth 2 concept that this could be a really great title.  He is paired with Nicola Scott – of whom I am a big fan.  She is a “newer” penciller – we first met her work in 2004.

The cover for issue #1 was done by Ivan Reis and Joe Prado – it’s busy as all get out, which I do not like.  However, I do think it is an explosive way to start the title.  I just wish it was a little less cluttered.  And I am reminded of the lovely delicious covers that Alex Ross did for the Justice Society of America – I need to remember, this ain’t daddy’s JSA.  This is new and improved and exciting Earth 2!  The taglines on the cover help with that:   A Different World!  A Different Destiny!

Anyway, the story starts with Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman battling aliens of some sort – and losing!  Batman seemingly sacrifices himself for the world in order to implant a computer virus into the enemy.  And he has a daughter, but most importantly, he’s emoting all over the place! I believe the majority of the issue is actually couched in a narrative done by Alan Scott, who is GBC’s Owner and CEO.  He has made a documentary of the great battle that has scarred the earth.  We meet Jay Garrick, too, who has a surprising encounter with who appears to be the god Mercury!

Overall, I feel the writing is very good.  The art looks nice too, although there are some frames that are really busy.  The frame wherein Wonder Woman is attacked by the enemy called Steppenwolf is of note – though I am not sure if I like it or not. I like the framing and the background and Steppenwolf.  But Wonder Woman’s face bugs me for some reason?  This is a minor complaint, though. The writing for her is good, she is given a real warrior/badass personality and it’s nice.

Yes, this world does seem different. And exciting.  I am very interested in what happens next and the creative team seems to be doing well. I have some reservations about the artwork, but nothing major and nothing that would prevent me from recommending this issue.  I cannot wait until the next issue is released and I have high hopes for the title.

4 stars

Superman #7

Superman 7

Superman #7; DC 2012

One of the biggest complaints about comics in the last decade has been about the Superman titles.  They have been awful.  And I think it’s something that has gnawed at DC Comics for a long time and for whatever reason, nothing they do for the title/character seems to work.  Particularly for the last five years, readers have been exceedingly disappointed with Superman and have expressed their concerns by simply not buying or reading these titles.  This is a really sad thing because Superman is so kosmically recognizable that there is just something unsettling about no one being interested, let alone excited, about his comics.

I think that within the deep recesses of the hearts of comic fans there was a, quite natural, hope that with DC’s New 52, Superman would be saved.  Not rehabilitated, but heroically saved.  The complaints of the last decade that Superman titles were boring, scattered, uninteresting, pointless, and stupid were valid and probably hit DC pretty hard.  So, everyone probably expected that the New 52 would solve these issues and send Superman titles to the top of the charts – where he belongs (even if fanboys do not dare admit they believe this).

On Action Comics, DC put the famous, but difficult, writer Grant Morrison.  I’ve gone over that situation in my reviews for Action Comics.  For the Superman title, DC gave the reins to writer George Perez.  Perez is one of those industry-standard writers who has written Wonder Woman and Silver Surfer among other titles. I was pleased that he was selected as I felt that he was a solid choice for a proven, but not extreme writing style.  Now, Superman also appears in DC’s “flagship” – Justice League, which is being written by star writer Geoff Johns.  Surely, with the New 52 and these three writers writing the character, there is no way Superman could fail.

Action Comics may or may not be good. It’s certainly not a “basic” comic read.  Morrison has some different perspectives and ideas as to how stories should be told.  Geoff Johns’ Superman is good – but since he’s a member of a supergroup, he does not get much face time or development.  Superman’s entrance, though, is still one of the highlights of the start of the New 52.  The Superman title penned by Perez looked so pretty. It contained a lot of action, fighting, flying, battling, etc.  However, it felt scattered and disconnected. Some readers felt it was confusing and disoriented.  Ultimately, it was a disappointment. While the character is freshened, the problems with the title still seemed to be present.  We all wanted to love the title. Most of us ended up dropping the title from subscription lists with a dejected, puzzled feeling.

However, it seems DC was willing to do something proactive about the situation.  Starting in issue #6, they added writers Dan Jurgens and Keith Giffen.  Both of these writers/artists are also solid creators who are no strangers to the industry.  Issue #6 was nothing great, but I do feel it was better than the previous five.  Finally, in issue #7, I can say that this is a real Superman comic.  This is a storyline that I can follow without frustration or annoyance.  This is art that looks fantastic and the character does not seem like a haphazard mess of confusion.

Superman’s thoughts are presented in a reasonable manner – he does seem younger and bolder.  The opening fight is easy to follow and interesting enough that it does not seem like just frames of action shots.  I like that there is a linear storyline – a problem, a setting, villains, and friends.  The art perfectly matches the story and the story seems, finally, like it is going somewhere.  The first five issues seemed really in media res and random.  This seems like there is a real story going on, which is a nice change. In other words, this issue is a well-organized, linear, solid story.  The artwork is above average and it is not messy.

I am interested in the villain, Helspont.  I know he has history in DC, but I want to see if the New 52 has changed anything – or will change anything. I want him to be a worthy villain that Superman can battle with both physically and intellectually. He’s also drawn to look mighty cool.

I kind of feel bad for those readers who dropped Superman before issue #7.  They probably won’t believe this is any good.  And, well, even though this issue is a solid 4 stars, all readers are probably dubious about believing that anything good will come to pass with this title, anyway.  After all, it’s hard to forget a decade of mediocrity and boring. It is my real hope, though, that Jurgens and Giffen CAN AND WILL make this a worthwhile, interesting title. But, one issue isn’t enough……….

4 stars